The Chinese G7 caricature and Winnie The Pooh-what the CPC is laughing about and not

The Chinese G7 caricature and Winnie The Pooh-what the CPC is laughing about and not

Illustration: Bantonglaoatang

Illustration: Bantonglaoatang

While Biden makes his tour to the G7, NATO, Putin and some other European countries, a new caricarure struggle is in the making. This time not Charlie Hebdo and Muhammed, but a caricature of a Chinese social media outet BanTonglao Atnng which was published on Weibo and get attraction of the mouthpiece of the CPC, the Global Times which  portrays the last G7 summit as a “last supper” of Western imperialists who want to eat  China- as a small cake , but powerless Western states won´t match with China and celebrate their last supper. While most German media ignored this detail and didn´t hype it as the Global Times, it was mainly the Welt (World) of the Springer Publishing House which also already invited Yoshua Wong as fighter for Hongkong as new Berlin in the tradition of a front state in the ColdWar. The Welt article discovers racism in the Chinese caricature and behaves like the Green Party with its emotionality regarding gender speak. The Welt however stopped to critizise the CC for antisemintism, while before the Central Council for Jews, critizised an neoliberal advertisement against Green future Chanclorr candidtate Annalenna Baerbock with compared the Greens with a new Moses who wanted a state religion. As this was agains the Greens and financed by a neoliberal capitalist lobby group “ Initiative for a New Social Market Economy”, the philosemite “Welt” didn´t  complain about antisemistism and racism. However, the article about the Chinese caricature of the G 7 summit is now labeled as “racism”:

“ Throughout history, animal comparisons have repeatedly conveyed racist stereotypes. China’s propaganda apparently has no problem with that Source: Bantonglaoatang The western industrial nations have agreed on a tougher stance towards Beijing. The regime there is wedging back – with a assertative  caricature. It iimitates the “Last Supper” by Leonardo da Vinci. However, around the table there are animals that are supposed to represent the respective nations. The comparison of animals alone awakens unpleasant memories in western viewers: throughout history, racist stereotypes have been conveyed time and again, so that something like this is taboo today. At least in the west.”

In this systemic clash of cultures, the Global Times publlishes the caricature and presents it as a good illustration of the G7 , its intentions, its differences, the power realtions and the coming decline of the failed G7 which unlike the G 20 cannot controll the world anymore. Former neoloberal crash economist Jeffrey Sachs also writes an article in Foreign Policy in which he demands the dissultion of the G 7 as it would not and could not fulfill the delievvery of global common goods and is in its real powr far behind its weakened power position and promises. However, why should the West disolve its institutions of the WEF in Davos, the Bilderberger, the Munich Security Conference r the G7. Maybe they cannot rule the world, but by its existence unite the West, give him a joint loud voice withi the G 20. However China tries to deligimitate the G7 and thereby the West.

‘The Last G7’: Satirical cartoon mocking bloc’s attempt to suppress China goes viral

By Global Times Published: Jun 13, 2021 06:00 PM

Illustration: Bantonglaoatang


 
A Chinese cartoonist’s political satire, which mocked the Group of Seven (G7) members that attempt to suppress China, went viral on Chinese social media on Sunday, when the G7 summit was underway in Cornwall, the UK.

Titled The Last G7, the illustration, published by its author “Bantonglaoatang” on Sina Weibo on Saturday, was painted based on the renowned religious mural The Last Supper. This G7 summit is widely seen as an attempt by the US to rally allies against China.

Similar to the final meal Jesus shared with his apostles before his crucifixion that The Last Supper depicted, Bantonglaoatang painted a vivid picture of nine animals – respectively representing the US, the UK, Italy, Canada, Japan, Germany, France, Australia and India – sitting around a table with a Chinese-map-shaped cake on it. On top of the painting is the words in quote: Through this we can still rule the world.

These animals have different facial expressions and gestures, implying that each side of the G7 actually has its own axe to grind on the common conspiracies of suppressing China and upholding the Western hegemony, analyzed some observers and Chinese netizens.

Wearing a bowler hat with an American flag on it, a bald eagle sits in the middle like Jesus in The Last Supper, obviously the convenor of the meal. In front of the bald eagle there is a small banknote printing machine and a bill on the table. The machine is printing toilet paper into dollars, and the number on the bill gets bigger and bigger – from $2 trillion to $8 trillion.

There is also an iron hook under its feet, and two pieces of cotton with blood near its hands on the table, suggesting “the US’ capital accumulation was built on racial oppression,” a vlogger nicknamed “sharp-tongued pumpkin” said in his latest video analyzing the illustration, which has gained over 700,000 views on video streaming platform Bilibili within a day after he uploaded it on Saturday afternoon.

The bald eagle image shows today’s aggressive yet feeble US is trapped in its growing debt crisis and racial conflicts, but still points fingers at China, “sharp-tongued pumpkin” pointed out.

Sitting on the left of the bald eagle is a grey wolf, wearing a cap with an Italian flag on it. The wolf waves its hands as the apostle Andrew in The Last Supper, as if saying “No” to the US’ suggestions of jointly cracking down on China. The grey wolf image shows Italy, the first European country that joined China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), is reluctant to collaborate with the US in suppressing China, commented “sharp-tongued pumpkin.” 

Next to the wolf is an Akita dog that represents Japan. Without a seat, it is busy serving the others a “drink” – pouring green radioactive water into the glasses of the other animals. On Weibo some users said the green water is the contaminated water that Japan plans to release to the Pacific from the destroyed Fukushima nuclear plant.

Sitting next to the dog is a kangaroo, which is stretching its left hand to the banknotes that the US is printing, while grasping a bag in its right hand. The kangaroo symbolizes the double-faced Australia which actively cooperates with the US in containing China, but is also eager to earn money from China, its largest trading partner, according to “sharp-tongued pumpkin.”

On the left corner stands a black hawk, which obviously represents Germany as its pose is almost the same as that of the German Chancellor Angela Merkel in a widespread photo in the G7 summit in 2018. Germany, similar to the rooster (representing France) sitting in silence on the right side, seems more interested in its own European issues and shows less enthusiasm on the US’ propaganda, netizens found.

On the right side of the table also sits a lion and a nutria, respectively representing the UK and Canada, both the US’ close Five Eyes allies. The nutria, wearing a red coat with images of marijuana on it, holds a doll in its hand. Many netizens believe the doll represents Huawei’s chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, who is still unreasonably detained in Canada.

On the right corner of the table sits an elephant (representing India) that is on a drip like a patient.

Under the table there is a frog holding banknotes in its hands, trying to jump as high as possible to reach the table and give the money to the US. The little frog symbolizes the separatist authority from the island of Taiwan, which is always subservient to the US, some netizens pointed out.

The illustration caused a stir on Weibo on Sunday, with numerous users praising the author for vividly and straightforwardly revealing the evil intentions of the West that tries to lay a siege to China. “But this is perhaps their ‘last supper,’’’ one user mocked. “With different positions, for various interests of their own, these countries and regions can’t form a real league against China.”

https://www.globaltimes.cn/page/202106/1226050.shtml

The Nikkei Asia reports:

The parody of da Vinci’s “The Last Supper” mocks members of the Group of Seven along with partners Australia and India.

 A bald eagle seated at the center of a table turns toilet paper into dollar bills while an Akita dog without a seat serves radioactive water from Fukushima to fellow animal guests.

These were among the details in a satirical cartoon based on Leonardo da Vinci’s “The Last Supper” mocking the Group of Seven and Washington’s efforts to build a coalition against China.

Titled “The Last G-7,” the piece went viral in China this weekend after it was published on Sina Weibo as the group’s summit took place in the U.K., where the question of how to deal with Beijing was high on the agenda.

Instead of Jesus and his disciples, the cartoon depicts animal-headed figures, most wearing hats with the flags of the countries they represent. A cake decorated with a map of China sits on the table.

In the center, where Jesus is positioned in the original painting, a bald eagle represents the U.S., with a money printer in front of it, in a swipe at the country’s rising debt.

Nearby, Japan, in the form of an Akita dog, pours a green liquid into attendees’ glasses from a kettle marked with a radiation symbol. The Chinese Communist Party-affiliated Global Times noted that some Weibo users saw the liquid as wastewater set to be released from the disaster-hit Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.

A beaver representing Canada holds a doll that the Global Times identified as Huawei Technologies Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou, who remains detained there amid a legal battle over her extradition to the U.S.

Though the stage is the G-7 meeting, the cartoon also depicts other international actors.

India, rendered as an elephant, kneels at the side of the table, connected to an intravenous drip with an oxygen canister nearby — references to the deadly wave of coronavirus cases that the country has grappled with. A kangaroo representing Australia reaches out for a pile of U.S. money while seated near an IV marked with the Chinese flag, symbolizing its economic reliance on Beijing.

Nearby, Japan, in the form of an Akita dog, pours a green liquid into attendees’ glasses from a kettle marked with a radiation symbol. The Chinese Communist Party-affiliated Global Times noted that some Weibo users saw the liquid as wastewater set to be released from the disaster-hit Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.

A beaver representing Canada holds a doll that the Global Times identified as Huawei Technologies Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou, who remains detained there amid a legal battle over her extradition to the U.S.

Though the stage is the G-7 meeting, the cartoon also depicts other international actors.

In the foreground, a frog holds bank notes and tries to reach up to the table in a depiction the Global Times called the “separatist authority” of Taiwan that is “subservient” to the U.S.

A number of satirical illustrations mocking other countries have recently been circulating in China, with prominent government officials among those amplifying them. Zhao Lijian, a spokesperson for China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, in April tweeted a parody of Katsushika Hokusai’s “Under the Wave off Kanagawa” showing barrels of radioactive liquid being dumped into the sea.

The Chinese Embassy in Japan in April posted a cartoon on its official Twitter account featuring the Grim Reaper clad in an American flag-patterned robe and carrying an Israeli flag scythe. The tweet was later deleted after a backlash from Japanese users and objections from the Israeli government.

https://asia.nikkei.com/Politics/International-relations/Last-G-7-China-revels-in-parody-mocking-US-and-allies

As the Sinoamerican tensions are rising and China , Russia and the EU get polarized due to it, one should relax and not behave like a hypersensitive mimosa and fun braker. Otherwise you will react like Xi Jinping when he censors every comparison with himself and Winnie The Pooh bear which became a wellmeaning caricature for Xi in Chinese social media: Xi not only prohibited Winnie, but also censored Disney movies or the US series South Park and put its serial actors  In the labor camp with Winnie the Pooh: China bans South Park Latest episode enraged Beijing government, all traces of South Park were deleted from the Chinese Internet. The US series South Park is famous for its controversy, satirically distributing in all directions. So also in the second episode of the 23rd season, when the makers target Hollywood for its ingratiation to the Chinese market. According to a report by The Hollywood Reporter, the Chinese government deleted all episodes of the cult series from the Chinese Internet in accordance with “current laws and regulations.” In the corresponding “South Park” episode, Randy Marsh plans to expand his marijuana empire by traveling to China. On the plane he meets some Marvel comic characters who also want to ingratiate themselves with the Chinese market on behalf of Disney.At the airport, however, Randy was arrested for “tasting” and sent to a labor camp. There he meets Winnie the Pooh and Piglet, among others. An allusion to the fact that the film “Christopher Robin”, in which the Pooh Bear plays a role, was banned in the Middle Kingdom last year. The problem of the Chinese state power with the comic bear relates to the fact that head of state Xi Jinping has been compared to the Winnie the Pooh in internet jokes. China bans “Winnie Pooh” film In the second storyline, Randy’s son Stan forms a metal band that a producer becomes aware of. He promises them big money if he can shoot a documentary about the band with them. However, the script has to be adapted to the Chinese market, which is why Chinese uniformed men monitor the production all the time.

China bans Winnie the Pooh film after comparisons to President Xi

This article is more than 2 years old

Memes likening Xi to the portly Pooh have become a vehicle in China to mock the country’s leader

winnie the pooh and Xi Jinping

The film Christopher Robin – an adaptation of AA Milne’s famous story about Winnie the Pooh – has been blocked by Chinese censors. Composite: Allstar/Disney/Anadolu Agency/Getty ImagesBenjamin Haas@haasbenjaminTue 7 Aug 2018 03.11 BST

Last modified on Tue 7 Aug 2018 19.55 BST

Who’s afraid of Winnie the Pooh? The Chinese government, apparently.

Chinese censors have banned the release of Christopher Robin, a new film adaptation of AA Milne’s beloved story about Winnie the Pooh, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

The Winnie the Pooh character has become a lighthearted way for people across China to mock their president, Xi Jinping, but it seems the government doesn’t find the joke very funny.

It started when Xi visited the US in 2013, and an image of Xi and then president Barack Obama walking together spurred comparisons to Winnie – a portly Xi – walking with Tigger, a lanky Obama.

Winnie the Pooh characters alongside Xi Jinping and Barack Obama.

Winnie the Pooh characters alongside Xi Jinping and Barack Obama. Photograph: REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque/Twitter/ @WhiteCurryLover

Xi was again compared to the fictional bear in 2014 during a meeting with Japan’s prime minister, Shinzo Abe, who took on the part of the pessimistic, gloomy donkey, Eeyore.

AA Milne’s characters Eeyore and Winnie the Pooh were compared to Japan’s prime minister, Shinzo Abe, and China’s President Xi Jingping.

AA Milne’s characters Eeyore and Winnie the Pooh were compared to Japan’s prime minister, Shinzo Abe, and China’s President Xi Jingping. Photograph: Kim Kyung-Hoon/Twitter/ REUTERS

As comparisons grew and the meme spread online, censors began erasing the images which mocked Xi. The website of US television station HBO was blocked last month after comedian John Oliver repeatedly made fun of the Chinese president’s apparent sensitivity over comparisons of his figure with that of Winnie. The segment also focused on China’s dismal human rights record.

Another comparison between Xi and Winnie during a military parade in 2015 became that year’s most censored image, according to Global Risk Insights. The firm said the Chinese government viewed the meme as “a serious effort to undermine the dignity of the presidential office and Xi himself”.

“Authoritarian regimes are often touchy, yet the backlash is confusing since the government is effectively squashing an potential positive, and organic, public image campaign for Xi,” the report said at the time. “Beijing’s reaction is doubly odd given the fact that Xi has made substantial efforts to create a cult of personality showing him as a benevolent ruler.”

Another reason for the film’s rejection by the authorities may be that China only allows 34 foreign films to be released in cinemas each year. That leaves Hollywood summer blockbusters, family films and contenders from across the world jockeying for a tiny number of spots.

Christopher Robin is the second Disney film to be denied a release this year, after A Wrinkle in Time was blocked, while the studio’s Ant Man and the Wasp will open this month.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/aug/07/china-bans-winnie-the-pooh-film-to-stop-comparisons-to-president-xi

The best reaction of the West was: Stay cool and relaxed and publish own caricatures of Xi Jinping. Hu Xijin and the CPChina. But not always as Panda and dragoon or as racist stereotypes recruiting from the Yellow Peril and Mc Carthyrism. .

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